News

News

  • A photographic exhibition entitled 'The Ties that Bind' is currently running at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in Edinburgh, featuring four photographers' take on Scottish legacy, engagement, tradition and the land itself. Part of this exhibition is a close look at women working in the landscape, and features six women working the land in a variety of settings.

  • Shopping for fresh, local, produce just became a whole lot more flexible with the brainchild of John Retson and his son, Stuart, of JSR Services.

  • Donald MacSween – or Sweeny as most folk know him - is a Lewis crofter with a dream.

  • NEXT YEAR, Drymen Show’s organisers are hoping to showcase two centuries of history at the event to celebrate the Strathendrick Agricultural Society’s 200th anniversary.

  • Gracefield Arts Centre in Dumfries is where ‘In Land’ a major new exhibition exploring farming, land and agricultural heritage, is running until October 24.

Features

Features

  • Love certainly does strange things to people, but for a young farm lass from Ballygowan in Northern Ireland it has meant packing up her cows and shipping them over to Perthshire.

  • Expansion is on the cards for the Juicy Meat Company, based just outside Kelso. The family run business has built up an excellent reputation for providing spit roasts at all sorts of events, and this spring they will launch their own range of meat products which will be featured in restaurants, farm shops, delicatessens and on hotel menus across Scotland, as they start providing the catering trade with their products.

  • When you are filled with enthusiasm for a community venture and need volunteers to help take it to the next level, you need to grab people's attention quickly. How's this for an opening gambit? "We are five gobby, dynamic women, full of ideas and two men who just roll their eyes and sigh."

  • How does a perfectly respectable primary school music teacher find herself being the waving hands in front of all our farmers who have found their singing voices and also being reported on the news as being part of a flash mob in Buchanan Street, in Glasgow, recently?

Recipes

Recipes

  • In the Spotlight with…Neil Forbes
    With Burns Night fast approaching we put one of Scotland’s most passionate chefs under the spotlight. This month Neil Forbes, Chef Director of Café St Honoré in Edinburgh, tells us who he would invite to his own Burns supper and he also shares with us how he believes Scotland’s food and drink industry will shape up in the future.

  • Chef patron of Perth’s 63 Tay Street, Graeme Pallister, believes there’s nothing better than a good leek and tattie soup at this time of year.

  • Hake has a mild and subtle flavour in comparison to other fish. However, this recipe from the award winning chef Neil Forbes, packs a punch and is perfect if you’re looking to experiment in the kitchen and introduce some new fish dishes to your repertoire.

  • “This is a great recipe for kids as well as grown-ups. My two children, Tom and Libby, helped with the mixing,” says Gregg, the presenter on the BBC’s Masterchef.

  • SCOTTISH FARMERS are determined to rekindle consumers' enthusiasm for Scotch lamb - and if you are out and about over the coming weekends, you might bump into some of these 'Lambassadors' handing out free hot samples!

Yesteryear

Yesteryear

  • Taking a look back at what was happening in the agricultural world over the last 100 years.

  • By Alison Mann

    IN FEBRUARY, 1989, Prince Charles’ appeal to farmers to abandon chemical-based intensive cropping methods in favour of natural organic husbandry sparked a rush from amateur gardeners for natural plant foods, chemical-free composts and manures made from cow manure, claimed a supplier. Andrew Ratcliffe, of Tonbridge-based Stimgro, said the prince’s speech seemed to have persuaded  many previously undecided gardners to try organic methods.

  • By Alison Mann
    It was announced in 1989 the potato collection which won its way into the Guiness Book of Records was to be kept going, though on a limited scale. At its peak, Donald MacLean, Dornock Farm, Crieff, had around 400 varieties of potato, but had scaled down the collection considerably before his death in October 1988. Mrs MacLean told The Scottish Farmer that she indeded to keep around 200 of the varieties on the farm, and felt it was an appropriate memorial to her husband’s life-long interests.

  • A MORAYSHIRE farmer got a fright when he found a live hand grenade in his field in 2003. Alan Watson, who found the grenade while grading potatoes at his farm near Keith, tapped it against a wooden boc, thinking it was just a dirty spud. “When the earth fell off it, I realised my mistake,’ said Mr Watson. “I just put it down and got clear of the area. I’m glad I didn’t tap it too hard.”

Queue 'Lifestyle: Country Lifestyle Scotland'

Queue 'Lifestyle: Country Lifestyle Scotland'

  • As the doors close on the historic March Street Mill in Peebles, a local hotel, The Park, has been collaborating with one of the Mill’s former textile designers to ‘upcycle’ many items from the Mill.

  • The Isle of Harris distillery – Scotland’s newest whisky distillery – is bringing in the New Year by celebrating the filling of its first casks with Scotland’s newest single malt.
    The first production of The Hearach single malt flowed from the distillery’s copper stills just before Christmas and the 561 litres produced have now been filled into casks 1, 2 and 3 of what is sure to become a very long line.

  • Callandar will host the start of the salmon season, on Febrauary 1, 2016, with a day of fun and games, opening by the renowned bushcraft and survial expert, Ray Mears.

  • Top TV adventurer takes to UK stages in first major solo tour

  • The eleven Green Belts in Scotland are a precious resource of national importance, as they protect and enhance the landscape setting of the towns and cities which they surround, encourage access to open space for urban residents and direct any necessary growth into more appropriate locations within settlements, says John Mayhew, director of The Association for the Protection of Rural Scotland (APRS).

Farmer Right-hand Column