News

News

Features

Features

  • Crook making – it’s a process that tests both patience and skill. Arthur Dent, of Doune, in Perthshire, thinks you either have it, or you don’t. He certainly ‘has’ it.

  • Today’s farm kitchen will be as modern as any throughout the land.  Convenience and ease of working both in the kitchen and with other housekeeping tasks will now be the norm.  

  • I’m sitting outside the treatment room at Neal’s Yard Remedies at Royal Exchange Square in Glasgow, with ten minutes to spare before a reflexology appointment I’ve been offered.

  • “WHAT KIND of bird...” my mother asked last Sunday, as we drank tea in the sitooterie, watching the to-ing and fro-ing from the bird feeders, “...is it that does the blue poos?”

  • The veg’ garden has certainly been through the wars. I was concerned that as the soil was so cold I would need to stimulate germination by putting a polycloche over the carrot seeds.

Recipes

Recipes

Yesteryear

Yesteryear

  • Taking a look back at what was happening in the agricultural world over the last 100 years.

  • By Alison Mann

    IN FEBRUARY, 1989, Prince Charles’ appeal to farmers to abandon chemical-based intensive cropping methods in favour of natural organic husbandry sparked a rush from amateur gardeners for natural plant foods, chemical-free composts and manures made from cow manure, claimed a supplier. Andrew Ratcliffe, of Tonbridge-based Stimgro, said the prince’s speech seemed to have persuaded  many previously undecided gardners to try organic methods.

  • By Alison Mann
    It was announced in 1989 the potato collection which won its way into the Guiness Book of Records was to be kept going, though on a limited scale. At its peak, Donald MacLean, Dornock Farm, Crieff, had around 400 varieties of potato, but had scaled down the collection considerably before his death in October 1988. Mrs MacLean told The Scottish Farmer that she indeded to keep around 200 of the varieties on the farm, and felt it was an appropriate memorial to her husband’s life-long interests.

  • A MORAYSHIRE farmer got a fright when he found a live hand grenade in his field in 2003. Alan Watson, who found the grenade while grading potatoes at his farm near Keith, tapped it against a wooden boc, thinking it was just a dirty spud. “When the earth fell off it, I realised my mistake,’ said Mr Watson. “I just put it down and got clear of the area. I’m glad I didn’t tap it too hard.”

Queue 'Lifestyle: Country Lifestyle Scotland'

Queue 'Lifestyle: Country Lifestyle Scotland'

  • The eleven Green Belts in Scotland are a precious resource of national importance, as they protect and enhance the landscape setting of the towns and cities which they surround, encourage access to open space for urban residents and direct any necessary growth into more appropriate locations within settlements, says John Mayhew, director of The Association for the Protection of Rural Scotland (APRS).

  • The Pentland Hills extend for 15 miles SE from the summit of Caerketton Hill, around a mile S of the Edinburgh bypass, to Mid Hill N of Dunsyre.

  • The Scottish Venison Partnership (SVP), the body that represents Scotland's venison producers, is searching for the best easy-to-cook venison recipe to help celebrate 'Eat Scottish Venison Day' which is on September 4.

  • If you have a big occasion in your calendar this year, then this is the competition for you! You could win a £300 voucher toward your perfect outfit. Plus three runners up win a discount voucher, along with a day’s fun at a photoshoot.
    Full details in the latest issue of Country Lifestyle Scotland. 

Farmer Right-hand Column