News

News

  • What is the collective noun for a bunch of grumpy agricultural journalists? Whatever it is, I am surrounded by it this week, as we come to terms with being beaten by one point by the National Farmers Union at the annual Kilbarchan Show cake competition.

  • The show down of the QMS cook off was billed as a Farming Media Head to Head, with The Scottish Farmer and Farmers Guardian taking part, and it proved to be great fun for both the ‘chefs’ and the audience.

  • The handcrafts marquee was as busy as ever this year, with visitors streaming in daily to look at the stunning level of expertise exhibited, all under this year’s theme, which was ‘nature’.

  • The Highland and Island are known for their fabulous seafish, but organisers of the Highlands and Islands Food and Drink Awards (HIFDA) know that there are many fantastic producers in the north that should have their produce recognised across the industry.

  • This weekend, Kerry Barr, a farmer’s daughter from Easter Kinleith Farm, in Currie, and also regional manager for NFUS’ Lothian and Borders region, will take her place in the line up at the Curling World Championships in New Brunswick, in Canada.

Features

Features

  • Having featured Aberfoyle-based milliner, Clare Workman some thirteen years ago at the start of her business venture, we think it only right to feature a proper goodbye at the end of her creative career.

  • As is so often the case when thinking back to how a business began, Linda Gardner, who runs “Strathearn Fleece and Fibre”,  can say that none of it was really planned. 

  • Spinners, knitters and weavers will flock to Argyll this summer for the West Coast's premier Gaelic wool festival.

  • Ten-year-old Emma Orr shares her trade secrets with The Scottish Farmer as she gets ready for another show season.

Recipes

Recipes

  • Pancakes are very easy to make and taste great.

  • What could be more tempting with a cup of tea, than freshly made fruit tea loaf.  Helen Wilson has supplied this easy recipe.

  • SCOTTISH BUTCHERS are gearing up for a busy bank holiday barbecue weekend – despite weather forecasts ranging from sunshine to snow!

  • Susan Brown, Boyach Farm, Isle of Whithorn, contacted The Scottish Farmer to say that she missed the reader's recipes that we used to feature.

Yesteryear

Yesteryear

  • By Alison Mann

    IN FEBRUARY, 1989, Prince Charles’ appeal to farmers to abandon chemical-based intensive cropping methods in favour of natural organic husbandry sparked a rush from amateur gardeners for natural plant foods, chemical-free composts and manures made from cow manure, claimed a supplier. Andrew Ratcliffe, of Tonbridge-based Stimgro, said the prince’s speech seemed to have persuaded  many previously undecided gardners to try organic methods.

  • By Alison Mann
    It was announced in 1989 the potato collection which won its way into the Guiness Book of Records was to be kept going, though on a limited scale. At its peak, Donald MacLean, Dornock Farm, Crieff, had around 400 varieties of potato, but had scaled down the collection considerably before his death in October 1988. Mrs MacLean told The Scottish Farmer that she indeded to keep around 200 of the varieties on the farm, and felt it was an appropriate memorial to her husband’s life-long interests.

  • A MORAYSHIRE farmer got a fright when he found a live hand grenade in his field in 2003. Alan Watson, who found the grenade while grading potatoes at his farm near Keith, tapped it against a wooden boc, thinking it was just a dirty spud. “When the earth fell off it, I realised my mistake,’ said Mr Watson. “I just put it down and got clear of the area. I’m glad I didn’t tap it too hard.”

  • – In 1987, a top price of 7500gns was paid for a five-month-old imported Angora buck, being purchased by Anne Bell, East Lothian.

Queue 'Lifestyle: Country Lifestyle Scotland'

Queue 'Lifestyle: Country Lifestyle Scotland'

  • We approach two garden sheds with the doors wide open, and from inside there emanates a racket that gives the impression of some fairly robust sawing and hammering. Along with the haze of sawdust that fills the air and has settled on most of the lawn, it is clear that there is some energetic woodwork going on inside.

  • By Karen Carruth
    Photographs: Rob Haining

    When you look closely at one of Victoria Kerr’s paintings, you begin to question whether it is a painting or a photograph. The detail is exquisite, and you can only imagine that there must be a great love of the subject to produce such results.

  • By Alison Mann
    Photographs: Jacqueline Adamson

    IT ALL started from a simple idea to make better use of lesser used cuts of meat, but now Mr C’s pies is an award-winning pie company supplying pies to some of the top places in Scotland.

  • By Karen Carruth

    It is inspiring to meet people who have set goals in their life and are working towards them at a pace. However, as Pippa Davie will testify with a shake of her head: “Do we have to reach them all in the one year?”
    It is all happening at Perkhill Estates, with their Aberdeen-Angus herd building up nicely, and their three holiday cottages attracting a high occupancy rate.

  • For many artisan producers, receiving awards and achieving recognition from chefs within your first year may seem like something of a dream come true but for Robert Mackenzie and his Ross-shire based Cullisse Highland Rapeseed Oil, that situation is very much a reality

Farmer Right-hand Column