• CONSTANTLY ADAPTING to suit the ever changing market is the name of the game in the Ewing family who, since moving from Ireland some 20 years ago, have switched from the dairy game to the world of pedigree and commercial cattle, with a few diversifications up their sleeve for good measure.

  • Few pedigree units have hit the headlines more than Jim Innes and sons, James and George’s Strathbogie Texel flock, but forget the numerous five-figure prices achieved, it’s the arable and beef cattle enterprises on this mixed farm that have always provided the real bread and butter .... up until now.

  • With an ever changing and evolving agricultural industry, there’s no doubt that planning and investing for the future is essential, and that’s certainly a top priority for the Wilson family, at Clackmae Farm, Earlston.

  • INFESTATIONS WITH lice can cause production losses due to reduced feeding time and damaged hides. 

  • OVINE PREGNANCY toxaemia – commonly known as twin lamb disease – is a common disease of pregnant ewes which occurs following a period of severe energy shortage.

  • THE LIMOUSIN cattle bred at Kinnahaird Farm, Contin, Ross-shire, are making a name for themselves having won the Scottish Limousin Club's small herd award for three successive years in 2008, 2009 and 2010.

  • PRODUCING THE top end of commercial sheep is not easy in any breed and it's a lot more difficult when you're working with three breeds, but it can be achieved and successfully at that as Jim Pate and Hazel Brown, who farm at Toxside and Moorfoot, at Gorebridge, have discovered in recent years.

  • SHEEP FARMERS looking for new Bluefaced Leicester sires at the upcoming Kelso Ram Sales, to be held next week, will have a tough decision ahead of them in selecting a tup, whether it be the traditional blue or the more recent crossing type.

  • FEW BREEDERS can claim to have been in their selected breed since its very beginnings, but the McKerrow family, who run the Nochnary flock of Texels near Freuchie, Fife, certainly can.

  • FORGET THE huge increase in feed prices and last year's horrendous wet weather which left many sheep farmers struggling to make ends meet – lambs can be finished solely off grass even in swamp like conditions in Scotland – by selecting the Hampshire Down as a terminal sire.