Question of the Week

Question of the Week

Columnists

Columnists

  • BY THE time you read this article on September 19, we could well know the outcome of the closely contested referendum for independence.

  • I have always been a supporter of the idea of Scotland's political independence but never did I imagine that I'd get the chance to vote for it in my early thirties.

  • As I sat in a combine in Perthshire this week with a good friend who has contributed to this column once last back end, he remarked that it was like trying to decide what to write an essay on at university.

  • I have tried to maintain an impartial view of the Independence debate, but for the economics of Scottish agriculture my analysis clearly draws me towards No Thanks.

  • In common with many I have agonised over how I should vote in the referendum.

Letters

Letters

  • SIR, - After failing to raise the fact that SNH was dictating the number of deer on Scotland's mountains as 10 per a 1000 acres or 100 per 10,000 acres I felt compelled to write again.

  • SIR, - By the time this letter is published we will know wether or not Scotland is to be an independent country.

  • SIR, - I have read most, but not all, of the published letters and comments on the Referendum, and I have purposefully delayed contacting The Scottish Farmer until such time as my comments, if published, will not affect the outcome of the Referendum in any way.

  • SIR, - I have been interested to read your coverage of the forthcoming referendum on Scottish independence from the UK.

  • SIR, - We have been told clearly by all the main UK parties that a currency union is not an option.

Euro Notebook

Euro Notebook

  • IT SEEMS bizarre writing this on a Wednesday morning, knowing that by the time it is read Scottish voters will, one way or the other, have made the biggest political decision in a generation.

  • POLITICS IS a murky game and that is as true in Europe as it is anywhere else.

  • IT IS not down to a single event - but it is difficult to escape the conclusion that cash could be scarce this winter on many farms.

  • WHEN THE European Commission was reforming the CAP it promised a less bureaucratic and more flexible policy.

  • POLITICIANS ARE often judged by how they respond in a crisis - and as he battles to secure a second term as farm commissioner, Dacian Ciolos has been handed a huge economic and political crisis, in the shape of the Russian ban on food imports.

Farmer Right-hand Column