AUDI has been one of the pioneers of all-wheel-drive, given its Quattro pedigree from the 1970s in rallying, but it's also used that experience to good effect in producing everyday cars for you and me.

One of the more recent is the Audi Q2, its compact SUV which was first introduced five years ago and which has just undergone a facelift. While it might not appear so at first glance, the buying public have taken to the dinky little Q2 and it is now the marque's third best selling model.

I remember when the numerals after a car's type made reference to the engine size, but Audi have confused the hell out of me by instead using the numerals as the basis of a spec' designation. Hence, the Audi Q2 35 refers to the fact that this is above the average but not quite at the top of the range in specification.

A rear three-quarter view of the Q2 shows off its contrasting aluminium coloured rear pillar

A rear three-quarter view of the Q2 shows off its contrasting aluminium coloured rear pillar

A 3.5-litre engine in such a small SUV would have been a revelation, indeed maybe a bit scary, but this Q2 relied on a 1.5 litre turbocharged, four-cylinder TFSI petrol engine which is capable for about 148 bhp. That gets it under nine seconds for the timed run – which ain't spectacular, but fits in well with the opposition such as the Nissan Juke, Volkswagen T-Roc or the Kia Sportage.

It is firmly in the premium bracket when set against those in terms of price. For instance, the model tested costs £30,420 at the base line, but once the extras for it were added in, the tested model hit £40,025.

The menu included 19-inch alloys in matt titanium with red brake calipers at £1250, Matrix headlights, including LED rear lights and dynamic indicators at £975 and a panoramic sunroof which would set you back £875.

On the outside, the facelift brings it in line with the Audi bolder front-end styling and also added better connectivity and safety features. It also means that it's slightly bulkier than before, but it still delivers a healthy combined fuel use of 44.8mpg, which is largely down to its 'cylinder-on-demand' technology.

As you'd expect from Audi, the gearbox is a treat. In this instance it was the impressive seven-speed auto box that delivered the power, with a dial in choice of actions ranging from 'efficiency' through to 'dynamic' and even the option of personalising it to suit your own style.

It doesn't have the biggest of cabins, but the extra little dimensions mean that there's still 405 litre of boot space behind the rear seats and when these are folded flat you can expect 1050 litres to pack your gear into.

Inside the cabin its all the usual VW/Audi efficiency, but there great option controls from the efficient hand control dial, rather than a fiddly touchscreen

Inside the cabin it's all the usual VW/Audi efficiency, but there great option controls from the efficient hand control dial, rather than a fiddly touchscreen

This model, from the S-line, featured black Alcantara leather upholstery with the S embossing and contrast stitching and for those who like a quality sound system aboard, there is a Bang and Olufsen set up to make the most of you music from a myriad of inputs to the system via the infotainment screen. As you would expect, that also includes full navigation, smartphone integration and many other tecchie bits to play with.

And you can do that using Audi's user friendly rotary dial near to your left hand, rather than fiddle about with the touchscreen.

Engine choice is a continual process, but only the 1.5 engine as tested was available from the get go, though at least one other petrol and a couple of diesel options are now available. Most Q2s are front wheel drive but Audi’s Quattro system is standard on the 2.0 diesel, as is the seven-speed S Tronic gearbox which was on the test car.

At least the test car also came with the option-costed £125 space-saver spare wheel and jack under the floor, rather than a on the move puncture repair outfit and compressor which seems to be the norm these days.